Skip to content

Archives

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
splash
Filter by Categories
Breastfeeding
Categories
Cow
Dairy and Human Health
Dairy Industry
Dog
Human
Human Milk
Mammary Biology
Mouse
Species
Milk vesicles uncovered

By: Anna Petherick, Ph.D.
Issue #4 | Date: 07 2012

As dairy animals go, Holstein cows are record breakers. They produce more milk than any other breed or species, enough to fill a large tank truck over the course of their lifetimes. But the details of what’s in their milk isn’t entirely clear. Among the mystery ingredients are those that reside within exosomes, tiny membrane-bound packages that tote around proteins from their host cell.

Read more >

Milk sugars keep gut cells together

By: Anna Petherick, Ph.D.
Issue #3 | Date: 06 2012

If a kid eats a mound of candy for breakfast, he’ll probably behave differently than if he had eaten eggs and toast. Bacteria, it turns out, are not so different.

Read more >

Dinosaur aunts, bacterial stowaways, and insect milk

By: Katie Hinde, Ph.D.
Issue #3 | Date: 06 2012

Milk is everywhere. From the dairy aisle at the grocery store to the explosive cover of the Mother’s Day issue of Time magazine, the ubiquity of milk makes it easy to take for granted. But surprisingly, milk synthesis is evolutionarily older than mammals. Milk is even older than dinosaurs.

Read more >

Adiponectin: Mother’s Fat Sends Love Letter to Baby via the Milk Express

By: Katie Hinde, Ph.D.
Issue #2 | Date: 05 2012

Body fat is not just for buffering us from famine, keeping us warm during winter, and causing our self-recrimination during swimsuit season. Our body fat is also an integral part of our endocrine signaling system. The emerging literature offers compelling insights into maternal hormones, their transfer via milk, and their consequences in the developing neonate.

Read more >

Multitasking milk oligosaccharides

By: Anna Petherick, Ph.D.
Issue #2 | Date: 05 2012

Like the moms who produce them, human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) juggle many different tasks. As we continue to discover their functions, their to-do list continues to grow. In a recent review, Jantscher-Krenn and Bode list HMO’s well-established jobs and shift the focus onto new ones.

Read more >

The Milky500: five hundred worthy proteins

By: Daniela Barile, Ph.D., Matthew Lange
Issue #2 | Date: 05 2012

The Indy 500 is perhaps the most famous car race in the United States. Unlike every other sporting competition in the world, the legendary 500 mile car race is celebrated with the victor drinking not Champagne, but rather a bottle of fresh milk! The latest research suggests that the term “500” may have more to do with the milk, than with the miles.

Read more >

Do offspring inherit more than genes?

By: Ross Tellam, Ph.D.
Issue #2 | Date: 05 2012

What if the saying “you are what you eat” became “you are what you and your parents ate”? The written slate of life’s experiences may not be completely wiped clean between generations. How would this knowledge influence our behavior as humans? How would it change livestock production systems?

Read more >

The Many Faces of Lactoferrin – variation is the name of the game!

By: Ross Tellam, Ph.D.
Issue #1 | Date: 04 2012

Fresh out of the womb, a newborn baby is challenged with armies of disease-causing microbes. How does he survive this onslaught? In some parts of the world, he doesn’t. Millions of babies die each year in the first few months of life from common infections. A recent publication by Barboza and colleagues unfolds how a major milk protein, lactoferrin, displays different “faces”, depending on which pathogens are present.

Read more >

Save Time, Read “SPLASH!”

By: Danielle G. Lemay, PhD
Issue #1 | Date: 04 2012

Imagine if you spent every minute of every day reading scientific articles that have the keyword “milk” associated with them. Suppose you read one article per hour, 24 hours a day. Even with this impossible regimen, you could not cover even half of the milk-related articles published each year. In 2011, there were over 20,000 journal articles published with the keyword “milk” in the PubMed, CAB Abstracts, Agricola, and FSTA databases.

The purpose of “SPLASH! milk science update”, IMGC’s innovative newsletter, is to make it easier for you to stay up-to-date with the scientific literature. Much easier.

Read more >