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Splash! Milk Science Update | International Milk Genomics Consortium

Keep up to date on the latest discoveries and news in milk science with our bi-monthly publication SPLASH!®

Current Issue #110

Issue Date: September 2022

Baby Backwash Can Trigger Immune Response in Milk
By: Lauren Milligan Newmark, Ph.D.

Mothers have many ways to tell if their infant might be sick—an increase in body temperature, a decrease in appetite, or even small changes in sleep habits could all hint that an illness is brewing. But milk researchers have long suspected that nursing infants have another, more direct means of communicating their health status to their mothers: backwash.

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Bring Back the Fat in Milk: Kids’ Edition
By: Lauren Milligan Newmark, Ph.D.

An apple a day keeps the doctor away. Feed a cold, starve a fever. Eating carrots will improve your eyesight. Everyone knows these are old wives’ tales and not actual dietary advice. But what happens when actual dietary advice becomes an old wives’ tale?

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Yogurt Enhanced with Prebiotics and Probiotics Improves Calcium Uptake in Young Women
By: Marina Wang

Yogurt can be a great source of calcium, with one 170-g tub containing over 200 mg of the critical nutrient. Calcium is vital in building healthy bones and teeth, as well as muscle, heart, and nerve function, but most calcium from food can’t be retained by the gut. Dietary calcium is not always in a form that is easily soluble, and only around 30% is absorbed into the body. Luckily, a new study conducted on young women shows this absorption rate can be improved 24% on average by consuming yogurt supplemented with synbiotics—a combination of pre- and probiotics.

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Remarkable Diversity of Milk-digesting Bacteria in Hunter-gatherer Infants
By: Marina Wang

The Hadza people in northern Tanzania are regarded as one of the last true hunter-gatherer societies left in the world. They typically live in social groups of between five and 30 people, and they spend much of their day hunting wildlife or foraging for honey, tubers, or fruit. Reflecting a unique and rarefied lifestyle is also their diverse and complex gut microbiome.

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